We’re ALL IN: free resources for inclusive youth work

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As part of the initial stages of our ALL IN project, we’re exploring inclusive youth work resources already out there and being used to improve practice and organisations. We didn’t want to keep these gems to ourselves, so today we’re sharing a few of our favourites.

 

8 Steps to Inclusive Youth Work

National Youth Council of Ireland (NYCI), 2016

Style: Toolkit

Aimed at: Directors, Managers, Project Leaders

Link: http://www.intercultural.ie/8steps

A practical step-by-step guide to embedded inclusive youth work practices into your organisation. It covers staff and volunteers, resources, monitoring and evaluation, as well as organisational policies. Although the core principles, standards and outcomes are in the Irish context, practitioners everywhere will find the systematic structure and best practice examples useful.

NYCI’s Access All Areas is definitely worth a mention and can be found on the same website.

 

Embedding inclusive practice in opportunities for youth social action

#iwill, 2014

Style: Report

Aimed at: #iwill Campaign Partners

Link: http://www.iwill.org.uk/?wpdmdl=7906

This report shares findings from a study about effective practice in enabling the full participation of young people in social action. It includes key messages from young people as well as practical lessons and case studies.

 

T-Kit on Social Inclusion

European Commission and the Council of Europe, 2003

Style: Toolkit

Aimed at: Youth Work Practitioners

Link: https://www.salto-youth.net/downloads/4-17-402/tkit%20Social%20Inclusion.pdf

This resource calls itself a ‘training kit’ (T-Kit – get it??), it is more of a toolkit as we would recognise. The T-Kit covers the theory behind inclusive practice as well as commonly asked areas such as terminology, whilst being realistic and gentle about what can be achieved. I particularly like this quote:

“Youth projects obviously cannot single-handedly eradicate poverty, unemployment, drug use, racism and xenophobia, educational underachievement, homelessness, abuse and neglect, youth crime or any of the other problems linked with young people’s social exclusion. But they can work with young people in informal settings, broadening their opportunities, providing new experiences and challenges, showing their faith in young people and bringing out of them what is best […]”

 

Inclusion by Design – Inclusion strategies for NGOs

SALTO-YOUTH, 2008

Style: Guide

Aimed at: Newcomers to strategy

Link: https://www.salto-youth.net/rc/inclusion/inclusionpublications/inclusionbydesign/

This resource focuses on supporting the development of inclusion strategies for newbies. It walks you through four phases, breaking down jargon and making it easy to build your very own strategy that centres inclusion.

 

Good Practice Directory

RIDE (Resources for Inclusion, Diversity and Equality), 2017

Style: Reference

Aimed at: Anyone in youth work sector

Link: http://rideproject.eu/media/ride-good-practice-directory-en.pdf

Similarly to ALL IN, RIDE is an Erasmus+ funded project to develop a toolbox of resources to support inclusive youth work practice. The directory brings together case studies from their partner countries and details their practice in supporting specific groups of young people.


Have we missed your favourite? What’s your go-to resource for inclusive youth work? Share them with us on #ALLINclusion. You can also tell us more about what you want to see from our training by filling out this brief survey: https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/CMJNWHM

 

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

This post was originally writted by Youthlink Scothland – You can visit the original post in their webpage visiting this link

[This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication [communication] reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.]